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Lenovo Miix 510 review

The Surface Pro 4’s combination of a solid OS in Windows 10 and elegant hardware made it the first tablet PC to live up to Microsoft’s message that a tablet really could replace a laptop. So if you were going to design a 2-in-1 tablet, it would make sense to emulate one that works, right?

The Lenovo Miix 510 definitely takes its design and feature cues from Microsoft’s star tablet — right down to the hinged kickstand that runs the width of the 12.2-inch screen. Lenovo brings its unique watchband-like hinges from its Yoga 900 series laptops to the kickstand, allowing you to tilt the screen back up to 170 degrees.

Combine that flexibility with its magnetic detachable keyboard folio cover (another nod to Microsoft) and you can type comfortably on a desk or slightly uncomfortably on your lap. With 1.5 millimeters of key travel, typing on the Miix 510’s backlit keyboard feels more like a regular laptop than you might expect. I still prefer Microsoft’s for its larger clickpad and full-size right-hand Shift key, but the Miix’s is otherwise excellent and it’s included in the price: Microsoft’s is a $130 optional accessory.

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Doppelgängers: The Surface Pro 4 (left) and the Miix 510.


Sarah Tew/CNET

The Miix 510 starts out less expensive than the Surface Pro 4, too. The configuration I tested is $750, AU$1,500 or £900. It has nearly the same specs as the Pro 4 we reviewed when it was released back at the end of 2015. As I write this review, the Pro costs $1,075 on Amazon — and again, that’s without the keyboard.

Although the Miix won’t charge you for a keyboard, you will have to pay for its Active Pen. But that costs less than $40 (£40, AU$60) and it has 2,048 levels of pressure sensitivity, twice that of the Surface Pen.

Lenovo Miix 510

Similar but different

There are a couple other differences that might sway you one way or the other. For example, instead of the Surface’s proprietary Connect connector, the Miix has a USB-C 3.0 port. With adapters and a single cable, you can connect a display and other peripherals and add Ethernet and external storage. The Surface Dock can also add these things, but Surface users are limited to Microsoft’s solutions or a more limited range of USB 3.0 accessories.

Both tablets have a single standard USB 3.0 port and a combo headphone-and-mic jack, but the Surface adds a microSD card slot. Not having a microSD card slot may not be a deal breaker, but the Lenovo’s lower-resolution screen could be. It’s got a 12.2-inch 1,920×1,200-pixel display compared to the Pro 4’s 12.3-inch 2,736×1,824-pixel resolution display. Side by side, the Surface’s display is sharper looking and generally looks better from close up and farther away. For the price difference, though, it’s not that much better.

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